Dillon Carmichael has just filmed a special new acoustic video for his song "Hell on an Angel," and he's showing it to Taste of Country readers first.

It's the title song from Carmichael's new album, which is set for release on Friday (Oct. 26). In the clip above, Carmichael gives a bare-bones rendition of the song. His gritty, genuine country voice is accompanied by only his own acoustic guitar and a dobro as he delivers a story about a man whose penchant for finding trouble puts the women in his life — from his mother to the woman who loves him — through the emotional wringer.

"Well I was hell on an angel, that liquor burned like gasoline / I had one foot in the fire the other steppin' on her wings / Well that temperature was risin' but I could not feel the heat / Well I was hell on an angel that loved the devil out of me," he sings in the chorus.

It's a song and performance that calls to mind classic country artists including Merle Haggard, as well as more contemporary singer-songwriters including Chris Stapleton, to whom Carmichael sometimes draws comparisons.

"Hell on an Angel" is drawn from real-life events.

“I wrote this song with another country artist named Daniel Smalley based on a story from his past," Carmichael tells us. "It’s a very personal story, and I was grateful that he felt that he was able to share it with me. This song pulls out my Southern rock influence, and it's so much fun to play live.”

The Kentucky native worked with acclaimed producer Dave Cobb on Hell on an Angel, which has earned strong advance notices from the New York Times Fall Review, the Fader, NPR’s Ann Powers, CMT and more. Carmichael — whose uncles are John Michael Montgomery and Montgomery Gentry singer Eddie Montgomery — made his Grand Ole Opry debut on Aug. 21, and the rising artist got two standing ovations during his first performance that night.

For more information about Dillon Carmichael, visit his official website, or keep up with him via Facebook or Twitter.

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